Dating house nails

In theory, hookup culture empowers millennial women with the time and space to focus on our ambitious goals while still giving us the benefit of sexual experience, right? As Maddie, my 22-year-old friend from Harvard (who, FYI, graduated with highest honors and is now at Yale Law School), puts it: "The 'I don't have time for dating' argument is bullshit.

As someone who has done both the dating and the casual-sex thing, hookups are much more draining of my emotional faculties..actually, my time."Sure, many women enjoy casual sex — and that's a valuable thing to point out given how old-fashioned society's attitudes on romance can still be.

Overdressed for the nonoccasion, I quelled my frustration with Trader Joe's maple clusters and reruns of The next morning, I texted Nate again — this time to acknowledge our failed plan: "Bummer about last night. The avoidance — and occasional tight-lipped smiles — continued through the fall semester. He was drunk and apologized for hurting my feelings that night in the fall. The culture of campus dating is broken..at least broken-ish. College kids do it, have always done it, and will always do it, whether they're in relationships or not.

And I think it's because we are a generation frightened of letting ourselves be emotionally vulnerable, addicted to communicating by text, and as a result, neglecting to treat each other with respect. Hookup Culture is as a cause of our broken social scene. Casual sex is not the evil root of all our problems..

Each club owns a beautiful mansion in Harvard Square, and many of them have existed for a century or more.

We account for 57 percent of college enrollment in the U. and earn 60 percent of bachelor's degrees, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, and this gender gap will continue to increase through 2020, the center predicts.

But I'm still not comfortable with Rosin's assertion that "feminist progress...depends on the existence of hookup culture."The career-focused and hyper-confident types of women upon whom Rosin focuses her argument reappeared in Kate Taylor's July 2013 feature "She Can Play That Game Too." In Taylor's story, female students at Penn speak proudly about the "cost-benefit" analyses and "low-investment costs" of hooking up as compared to being in committed relationships.

The fact that women now invest in their ambitions rather than spend college looking for a husband (the old MRS degree) is a good thing.

But Rosin doesn't acknowledge that there is still sexism lurking beneath her assertion that women are now able to "keep pace with the boys." Is the fact that some college women are now approaching casual sex with a stereotypically masculine attitude a sign of progress?

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