Rules in dating

Authors Sherrie Schneider and Ellen Fein took a wise and biting tone with readers, outlining such unbreakable principles as, "Always end phone calls first," and "be a From the start, the book had its critics — those who called out the book as an anti-feminist, "goose-step guide to dating." Indeed, the entire program hinged on the concept of men as dimwitted hunters and women as the elusive, shiny-haired bait.

They showed the pain of a family goes through when losing a loved one. Most sit-coms now-a-days shy too much away from reality and give us a syrupy-sweet, trite twenty minutes of simulated laugh tracks and simulated humor.

Proponents of the methods offered in the book point to The Rules as having positive results for both men and women.

They represent the point of view that men enjoy being the aggressor and are inspired to treat women better who choose behaviors which set up boundaries and slow down the courtship process.

In February 1995, a new dating book hit shelves, claiming to offer "time-tested secrets for capturing the heart of Mr.

Right." It became a national best seller, teaching women all over the world how to snag a man, keep him on the line, and reel that sucker all the way to the altar.

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